INFORMATIVE BREAST CANCER INFO, INCLUDING BREAST CANCER STATISTICS FOR BOTH MEN AND WOMEN…

Posted on October 22, 2009. Filed under: Health and Wellness... |

 
An ounce of prevention can possibly save your life or the life of a loved one.  I’ve included a link to Susan G. Komen’s site map to help you navigate to specific topics.  This is a great site with a wealth of information.  By now, you must know that breast cancer strikes men as well as women…
 
Here are the statistics for men: 
 
The American Cancer Society estimates that in 2009 about 1,910 new cases of invasive breast cancer will be diagnosed among men in the United States. Breast cancer is about 100 times less common among men than among women. For men, the lifetime risk of getting breast cancer is about 1/10th of 1% (1 in 1,000). The number of breast cancer cases in men relative to the population has been fairly stable over the last 30 years.
 
In 2009, about 440 men will die from breast cancer in the United States.
 
The prognosis (outlook) for men with breast cancer was once thought to be worse than that for women, but recent studies have not found this to be true. Based on looking at each stage, the survival rates are about equal. In other words, men and women with the same stage of breast cancer have a fairly similar outlook for survival.
 
 
Here are the statistics for women:
 
Breast cancer is the most common cancer among American women, except for skin cancers. The chance of developing invasive breast cancer at some time in a woman’s life is a little less than 1 in 8 (12%).

 

The American Cancer Society’s most recent estimates for breast cancer in the United States are for 2009:

 

About 192,370 new cases of invasive breast cancer will be diagnosed in women.

 

About 62,280 new cases of carcinoma in situ (CIS) will be diagnosed (CIS is non-invasive and is the earliest form of breast cancer).

 

About 40,170 women will die from breast cancer.

§   

After increasing for more than 2 decades, female breast cancer incidence rates decreased by about 2% per year from 1999 to 2006. This decrease may be due at least in part to less use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) after the results of the Women’s Health Initiative were published in 2002. This study linked HRT use to an increased risk of breast cancer and heart diseases.

 

Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in women, exceeded only by lung cancer. The chance that breast cancer will be responsible for a woman’s death is about 1 in 35 (about 3%). Death rates from breast cancer have been declining since about 1990, with larger decreases in women younger than 50. These decreases are believed to be the result of earlier detection through screening and increased awareness, as well as improved treatment.

 

At this time there are over 2.5 million breast cancer survivors in the United States. (This includes women still being treated and those who have completed treatment.) Survival rates are discussed in the section "How is breast cancer staged?"

 
QueenBee
 
 

Susan G. Komen For The Cure (Site Map)

 

Breast Self-Exam Video

 

 

From WebMD…

 

Breast Self Exam Tool
 

Monthly breast self-exams are an option for all women beginning by age 20. Women who regularly examine their breasts become more aware of how their breasts normally feel. They are more likely to notice changes — including masses or lumps — that could be early signs of cancer. It’s best to check about a week after your period, when breasts are not swollen or tender. If you no longer have a period, examine yourself on the same day every month. If you see or feel a change in your breasts, see your doctor immediately. But remember, most of the time breast changes are not cancer.
 

Test 1
Using a mirror, inspect your breasts with your arms at your sides, with your hands on your hips, and with your arms raised while flexing your chest muscles.
 
 
Test 2
Look for any changes in contour, swelling, dimpling of skin, or appearance of the nipple. It is normal if your right and left breasts do not match exactly.
 
 
Test 3
Using the pads of your fingers, press firmly on your breast, checking the entire breast and armpit area. Move around your breast in a circular, up-and-down, or wedge pattern. Remember to use the same method every month. Check both breasts.
 
 
Test 4
There are three patterns you can use to examine your breast: the circular, the up-and-down, and the wedge patterns. Use the pattern that is easiest for you, and use the same pattern every month.
 
 
Test 5
Gently squeeze the nipple of each breast and report any discharge to your doctor immediately.
 
 
Test 6
Examine both breasts lying down. To examine the right breast, place a pillow under your right shoulder and place your right hand behind your head. Using the pads of your fingers, press firmly, checking the entire breast and armpit area. Use the same pattern you used while standing. Repeat for your left breast.
 
 

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